Cowichan Green Community Has Your Back

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Composed by Karen Bernard and Kat Brust.
 
It is easy to feel a little out of control these days but there are things that you can do in response to the events that are rapidly changing our world.
The Cow-Op Online Farmers Market is an important asset for social distancing and self-isolating. Supporting local agriculture is a win-win by keeping our farmers employed and the supply local with the added bonus that the only people touching your food are the farmers and the people packaging your order. The pickup times are in a range so that not everyone is picking up at the same time. If you are in Duncan, there is the option of bike delivery. Cow-Op will be adding more farms and delivery services in response to the current situation.
We are fortunate that the Cowichan Region is home to many farms and food producers and a large number have farm stands. Our local farm map, produced by Cowichan Green Community shows where to find a wide variety of products. Many of these farms also run a CSA, community-supported agriculture, which gives you an amount of seasonal produce each week for an appropriate cost. If you don’t already have a map, ask to have one added to your Cow-Op order.
This may be the year that you finally have the time to put in a garden. Jan at Ceres Edible Landscaping is available for consultation and contract. She can be contacted at janice@cowichangreencommunity.org or by phoning 250-748-8506.
Need seeds? If you are putting in a garden, you will. Cowichan Agricultural Seed Hub has locally grown organic seeds available at our store at 360 Duncan Street or at Buckerfield’s. Online through our website at cowichangreencommunity.org at seedhub@cowichangreencommunity.org or order on Cow-Op.
Vegetables to start now include spinach, peas, lettuce, bok choy, lentils, chickpeas, beets, and carrots. Pulses are also a great option for the garden, not just because the harvest is protein-rich and easily stored but also because they are nitrogen fixers and easy to seed save from. Maintain a 10-foot isolation distance between varieties of the same plant, grow at least five plants in a grouping and let the seeds dry in the pods on the plant. Pulses include peas, lentils, chickpeas and beans. Choose a bean variety that can be eaten early in the season and saved as a dried bean.
The Cowichan Valley has been doing much to move towards food security in the last few years. We have locally milled grain, milk delivery, and so many fine farms. Together, we will get through this.
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